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Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers

Author(s):
Tom Myers

Date:
05.2012

Journal:
Groundwater

Key findings:

  • The reason fracking works to force gas out of the rock is also why some observers think injection wells could be unstable – the extreme pressure of injection can take nearly a year to dissipate.
  • The lingering higher-than-normal pressure could bring formation waters, along with fracking chemicals, closer to the surface far faster than would occur over natural geological time scales of thousands of years, especially if there are faults and/or abandoned wells within the fracking zone.

Bibliography:
Myers, T. (2012), Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers. Groundwater, 50: 872–882. doi:10.1111/j.1745-6584.2012.00933.x
Abstract

See also:

Abrahm Lustgarten, New Study Predicts Frack Fluids Can Migrate to Aquifers Within Years, ProPublica, May 1, 2012, 2:29 p.m.

Andy Rowell, Fracking Can Contaminate Aquifers, Oil Change International, May 2, 2012

Vanessa Lamers, Possible contamination pathways from fracking, Yale Environment Review, Sept. 18, 2012

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